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By Akira The Don on Sunday, February 28th, 2010

Send submissions to fyeahdeburgh@googlemail.com

— By Akira The Don on Sunday, February 28th, 2010

By Akira The Don on Sunday, February 28th, 2010

Send submissions to fyeahdeburgh@googlemail.com

Wow.

That video’s amazing. Watch him kiss the child. KISS THE CHILD! KIIIIIIIIIIISS THE CHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIILD!

— By Akira The Don on Sunday, February 28th, 2010

By Akira The Don on Sunday, February 28th, 2010

“DRIVE! DRIVE FAST!”

Antwoord can’t do ish but WIN, that’s just truefax. Word to Zef.

Spotted by ZP.

— By Akira The Don on Sunday, February 28th, 2010

By Akira The Don on Sunday, February 28th, 2010

Send submissions to fyeahdeburgh@googlemail.com

— By Akira The Don on Sunday, February 28th, 2010

By Akira The Don on Saturday, February 27th, 2010

AHAHAHAHAHA.

— By Akira The Don on Saturday, February 27th, 2010

By Akira The Don on Saturday, February 27th, 2010

Johnny Depp narrates this new documentary, OBVS. Michael Simmons reviews the film on the Mojo blog, thusly:

DiCillo’s hardest task has been to do justice to the charisma of Mr. Mojo Risin’ (one of Jim Morrison’s many handles, in this case an anagram of his name); I saw The Doors live in January 1969 and can attest that Morrison glowed, generating tangible heat. And yet, 39 years since his death, the Morrison magic comes through loud and clear, as the film traces the transformation of 1965’s callow California kids into the jaded, burnt-out rock stars of 1971. Along the way, we witness every over-told incident in Doors history: Light My Fire and the subsequent string of hits, the adoration of trendsetters du jour like Andy Warhol, Morrison’s refusal to sell out – whether it be changing a controversial lyric for Ed Sullivan or selling a song for a car commercial – his increasingly self-destructive behaviour, the two books of poems published in his lifetime, the penis-flashing in Miami that never happened, and the poète maudit’s Parisian finale.

The musical contributions of the other Doors are emphasized, from drummer John Densmore’s deft swing to guitarist Robbie Krieger’s flamenco fingering and organist Ray Manzarek’s Bach mastery, serving to remind that there would’ve been no Doors without the other Doors. Morrison’s excellence as a singer is also noted, a fact often overlooked in the accounts of his antics. When he was younger, his vocal role model was Elvis; as he got older it was Sinatra and one can clearly hear Ol’ Blues Eyes’ in Jim’s caress of a note.

The footage feels fresh and intimate. There are clips of Morrison’s underground movie from his university days, a sweet Jim playing with children, fly-on-the-wall recording studio scenes, as well as the familiar live concerts where we witness Jim the consummate performer and Jimbo the inebriated clown. But it’s the shots lifted from Morrison’s own experimental films HWY and Feast Of Friends(the former the source of that Ford Mustang footage) that allow us entry into the omnivorous, risky, arty mind of the front Door.

— By Akira The Don on Saturday, February 27th, 2010